Tunisia extends, Mali declares state of emergency

Tunisia extends, Mali declares state of emergency

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Mali has declared a state of emergency in the country for a 10-day period while Tunisia has extended emergency rule over terrorism threats and political divisions

Mali reimposed a nationwide state of emergency for the final 10 days of the year 2015 to counter any terror threats, after a deadly terrorist attack in the capital.

A government statement issued overnight said it was imposed because of “the evolution of the security situation in Mali and in the surrounding area.”

The “state of emergency covers all national territory as of midnight December 21, 2015 for 10 days,” said the statement made public after a cabinet meeting late Monday.It “aims to give authorities the means to better prevent and fight any plan to attack the security and property of citizens and any attempt to disturb

It “aims to give authorities the means to better prevent and fight any plan to attack the security and property of citizens and any attempt to disturb peace,” it said. The measure notably allows security forces to act to pre-empt any threat and to restrict public gatherings.

It’s the second, 10-day state of emergency Mali has declared in a month.

Insecurity has gripped Mali since 2012 when a power vacuum saw Islamic extremists take control of the north. A French-led military operation pushed extremists from major towns in 2013, but attacks continue.

Tunisia extends state of emergency

Meanwhile, the government of Tunisia – which has seen three major terror attacks this year by suspected Islamic State (ISIS) militants – has extended its 30-day emergency powers for a further two months.

A curfew in the capital Tunis, has been imposed and the border with Libya, where investigators believe the attacks were planned, has been sealed.

President Beji Caid Essebsi has “decided on an extension of the state of emergency over all the territory” of the country until 21 February, 2016, a statement issued by his office said.

The measure was last imposed on 24 November following a suicide attack in the capital that killed 12 presidential guards. It had been due to expire on Wednesday.

Tunisia – the cradle of the Arab Spring uprisings – has been plagued by political chaos and violence since the 2011 overthrow of longtime dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

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