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International Relations Insights & Analysis (IRIA) is a research institute focusing on critical issues that threaten international peace & security. IRIA investigates and offers analysis on security, energy, terrorism, foreign affairs as well as global political agendas. We formulate concise and meaningful research presented in an interesting and interactive manner. IRIA special reports include experts’ opinion, special features, cost & benefit analysis, examine risk & opportunities, as well as evaluate threats and suggest countermeasures. The key findings of reports and analysis highlight pragmatic policy options and revise strategies.




IRIA Latest Reports


Definitions of genocide have been produced by lawyers, scholars, politicians and victims. Debates about these definitions manifest in tension over broad and narrow conceptions of genocide. For instance, the UN Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide narrows target groups to those with ethnic, religious, racial, national identity. The term is also used more broadly as a rhetorical device by news media and activists in order to mobilize popular opinion. The simplest definition of genocide is that it is the intended destruction of specific groups. Despite definitional debates, this type of destructive action has been part of human history as long as warfare itself, however, the two are not necessarily synonymous. Whilst war can occur without genocide, genocide rarely occurs without war, yet, this is not a strictly cause and effect relationship. This explorative article will address social and legal approaches to genocide, some historic intersections of war and genocide, the problematic nature of intent and ideology, humanitarian warfare aimed at preventing...

There has been little academic insight into the social, political, and economic drivers behind the self-proclaimed Islamic State’s emergence in Iraq and Syria. The current narrative attempts to explain IS’ emergence in the form of religious fanaticism. The paper challenges this oversimplified narrative and argues that the support IS received from local Sunni Arab populations during its emergence was a response to widespread marginalization following the 2003 invasion of Iraq. De-Ba’athification laws disenfranchised the Sunni Arab community who had previously held political power until the ousting of Saddam Hussein. Furthermore, Sunni politicians were targeted by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, which eliminated what little political influence the Sunni Arab population held following 2003. At the community level, Sunni regions of Iraq were controlled by occupation-like conditions under a Shi’a-dominant federal police force. These conditions led many in the Sunni Arab community to support IS as the least of two evils...

The Boston Marathon bombers and US Army Psychiatrist Dr. Hasan were examples of individuals who shined a light on the dangerous implications of what many call “lone wolf ” terrorism. Individuals taking up a cause in homicidal (as well as suicidal) manners is a very terrifying and often illusive concept. These lone acts of terror seem to be random and unexplainable, as it is difficult to account for the various differences of each respective attack by lone wolves. However, a deeper look into the anatomy of a lone wolf terrorist and the factors surrounding the phenomenon can illustrate common patterns to help clarify its mysticism. The first logical questions is, what exactly constitutes a lone wolf terrorist? To answer this, it is imperative to establish what a terrorist is and terrorist actions are. Terrorism is a politically-motivated entity. Politics, as it should be known, refers to the distribution of power. Terrorist actions are carried out in the hopes of some sort of power re-distribution in society...